Rudolph Hedgehog Hasselbacks!

Prep Time:10 Mins, Cook Time: 1 Hour, Total Time: 1 Hour, 10 Mins

December 21, 2013

Eat Your Veg | Hasselback PotatoesI was recently sent a gorgeous roasting pack from Rudolph Potatoes to try out. Not only were there two big bags of glorious red ‘Rudolph’ Potatoes, but a fabulous roasting pan and a fun and festive Rudolph Potatoes red apron. Thanking you very kindly folks!

Rudolph Potatoes are a maincrop potato with distinctively vibrant red skin and a contrasting snowy white flesh. Naturally sweet in flavour with a smooth and creamy texture. They also happen to be good all rounders in the kitchen, as the site says they’re “equally good baked, mashed or, roasted”. And obviously pretty festive in name and colour!

Rudolph Potatoes Roasting Pack

So what to make with my Rudolphs? As it happened I’ve been meaning to try out Hasselback Potatoes for ages now. They evoke happy memories of my Dad baking them as part of a sunday lunch when I was wee nipper, always to my utter delight!. I’m sure we used to call them Hedgehog Potatoes. So I thought it would be lovely to make them for my kids too, who I have to say were suitably impressed. They loved peeling back the individual layers and eating them like fat crisps, and made potato eating a good deal more fun than boring ol’ mash or roasties, which I do tend to over-make.

Hasselback potatoes might look fiddly but they’re actually a bit of a cinch to make. Simply a series of fine slices through the flesh (using a wooden spoon to rest them on which helps ensure you don’t slice all the way through), a basting in butter and popping in the oven to roast for an hour (size depending). I generally leave the skin on my potatoes, even when mashing and roasting, and so I did for these too with the added bonus of a lovely crispy (nutrient dense) red skin to crunch on.

I’m reckoning these would make a fun alternative to roasties with your christmas dinner too. Please do look out for more Rudolph recipes over the festive period, I’ve a couple more ideas up my sleeve which I’m very excited to be trying out soon.

Eat Your Veg | Rudolph Hasselback Potatoes RecipeAs these would be fun to serve at a party I’m entering the post to Four Seasons Food, co-hosted by myself and this month by Anneli over at Delicieux where the theme so happens to be Party Food. And being a fun eat for the little folk to Family Foodies, a challange hosted this month my myself and co-hosted by Vanesther at Bangers & Mash. Unsurprisingly it’s all about Kids Christmas for December. As if we could do anything else!

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Disclosure: I was sent a complimentary Roasting Pack from Rudolph Potatoes to try out. No money exchanged hands and I was not expected to write a positive view, all opinions are my own.

 

The Good Stuff:

Potatoes, even better if you leave the skin on where a good deal of the nutrients can be found



Great For:

Toddlers, Pre-Schoolers, Big Kids, Grown Ups, Sunday Lunches, Special Meals, Weekend Slowies,  Christmas Dinner



Notes:

I like to leave the well-scrubbed skins on my potatoes, but do peel if you prefer



Special Equipment:

A small baking tray, a pastry brush



Rudolph Hedgehog Hasselbacks!

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Ingredients Prep Time:10 Mins, Cook Time: 1 Hour, Total Time: 1 Hour, 10 Mins

For 4 people:
4 – 6 medium sized Rudlolph or other potatoes, well scrubbed if leaving upeeled
1 tablespoon butter
salt and pepper

1) Preheat your oven to 200ºc/180ºc fan/Gas Mark 6
2) Place each potato in the spoon of a wooden spoon and carefully and fairly finely slice through until almost reaching the bottom (the spoon should prevent you slicing all the way through). Slice each in the same way
3) Melt the butter and stir in a pinch of salt and pepper
4) Brush the butter all over the surface of each potato and down each of the cut slices
5) Place in the hot oven for 1 Hour, removing and basting once or twice during the cooking time. They’ll naturally fan out during baking

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23 thoughts on “Rudolph Hedgehog Hasselbacks!

    1. Louisa

      Leaving the skin on works so well with these, adding a bit of colour as well as a tastier bit of crunch. I never really understand why most people peel potatoes!.

      Reply
    1. Louisa

      Thanks Bintu. They’re actually like fat crisps, but soft on the inside and crunchy on the outside. And very popular with my kids (who are crisp fiends!).

      Reply
  1. Anneli Faiers

    Brilliant Lou!! I love them 🙂 I have never made hasselback potatoes before, one of those things I have been meaning to do but have not gotten round to. Yours are just perfect and look so pretty and crunchy. Now I know I must make some. Thanks for another fab entry to FSF xx

    Reply
    1. Louisa

      Thanks Anneli! They’re a fun little side and not at all fiddly as you might imagine – especially if you employ a wooden spoon to hold them in while you slice.

      Reply
  2. Emily @amummytoo

    They look fabulous! Definitely a good choice of potato to do this with – I shall get some. Thanks so much for linking up with #recipeoftheweek. I’ve Pinned and tweeted this recipe and there’s a new linky live now – hope you join in 🙂

    Reply
  3. Fran @ G'day Souffle'

    Hi Lou, name is Fran from G’day Souffle’- I saw your blog through Anneli’s ‘Delicieux’ blog. I was really attracted to your Hedgehog Hasselback potatoes- I have never seen them before and they look quite unusual. I’ll have to try them soon! I live in Australia and am originally from the US. Cheers to a Happy New Year!

    Reply
    1. Louisa

      G’day Fran! Nice to meet you and thanks so much for dropping by. Hasselbacks appear to be quite a rare thing here too (judging by the fact they’ve gone a little wild on Pinterest!), and it was only the memory of my Dad making them for me as a child than spurred me on to give them a go with my little lot. And they’re really rather delicious and not at all fiddly, a welcome change to the good old roastie.

      Reply
  4. Corina

    I’ve made these once a couple of years ago but really have to make them again after seeing them here as a reminder. I love all the crispiness you get from cutting into them before roasting them.

    Reply

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